Photo 24 Jul 269 notes disneylandguru:

disneylandguru:

More than 6,497,870 balloons have been sold at Disneyland, including the popular “Mickey Mouse” shaped pastel colored balloons. 17,366,743 cubic feet of helium have been utilized to inflate these lighter-than-air souvenirs (enough helium gas has filled Disneyland balloons to float a fleet of 85 modern blimps, each measuring nearly 200 feet long).


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disneylandguru:

disneylandguru:

More than 6,497,870 balloons have been sold at Disneyland, including the popular “Mickey Mouse” shaped pastel colored balloons. 17,366,743 cubic feet of helium have been utilized to inflate these lighter-than-air souvenirs (enough helium gas has filled Disneyland balloons to float a fleet of 85 modern blimps, each measuring nearly 200 feet long).

Video 24 Jul 4,643 notes

hiddlesfeelings:

WHOEVER MADE THIS GIFSET, THANK YOU!

(Source: sebastixnstan)

Link 24 Jul 9,184 notes The 13 Most Common Errors on a Novel's First Page»

boazpriestly:

  • Over-explanation. This includes prologues. “Prologues are never needed. You can usually throw them in the garbage. They’re usually put on as a patch.”
  • Too much data. “You’re trying to seduce your reader, not burden them,” Friedman said.
  • Over-writing, or “trying too hard.” “We think the more description we add, the more vivid it will be; but we don’t want to be distracted from the story” we open the book for.
  • Beginning the novel with an interior monologue or reflection. Usually this is written as the thoughts of a character who is sitting alone, musing and thinking back on a story. Just start with the story.
  • Beginning the novel with a flashback. Friedman isn’t entirely anti-flashback, but the novel’s opening page is the wrong place for one.
  • Beginning a novel with the “waking up sequence” of a character waking, getting out of bed, putting on slippers, heading for the kitchen and coffee…a cliche
  • Related cliche: beginning the novel with an alarm clock or a ringing phone
  • Starting out with an “ordinary day’s routine” for the main character
  • Beginning with “crisis moments” that aren’t unique: “When the doctor said ‘malignant,’ my life changed forever…” or “The day my father left us I was seven years old…”
  • Don’t start with a dialogue that doesn’t have any context. Building characterization through dialogue is okay anywhere else but there.
  • Starting with backstory, or “going back, then going forward.”
  • Info dump. More formally called “exposition.”
  • Character dump, which is four or more characters on the first page.

Photo 24 Jul 1,548 notes torrilla:

Tom Hiddleston as Edward in Archipelago

torrilla:

Tom Hiddleston as Edward in Archipelago

Photo 24 Jul 4 notes chef-mickeys:

Paradise Pier by Crustopher on Flickr.
Photo 24 Jul 15 notes chef-mickeys:

Friends Forever by Michael Billick Photography on Flickr.
Photo 24 Jul 424 notes
Video 24 Jul 2,574 notes

(Source: bckysoldier)

via .
Video 24 Jul 1,710 notes

(Source: pixardaily)

Video 24 Jul 20,248 notes

(Source: donne-moi-amour)


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